Opportunities Abroad—Why You Should Consider Teaching the Humanities Outside the U.S.

This event is part of the Co-Sponsorships Program: "Opportunities Abroad" talk by visiting speaker James Lambert.
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 5:30pm
Event Location: 
Gerber Lounge
304 English-Philosophy Building
Iowa City, IA 52242
James Lambert and students

Graduate students in the humanities are invited to meet Professor James Lambert as he shares his experience in teaching overseas at the American University of Kuwait—including how to apply for international positions, the benefits and challenges, and the value of international teaching for those ultimately seeking academic careers in the U.S.  

During his visit to Iowa City, James will also discuss ways to harness the trans-global/cross-cultural power of Shakespeare performance in the classroom at the September 24-25 conference, TEACHING SHAKESPEARE IN IOWA,  being organized by Adam Hooks, UI professor of English. The conference is part of the programming connected to the Shakespeare Folio exhibit at the University of Iowa Main Library. In addition, he will meet with graduate students from the humanities to share his international teaching experience and why teaching abroad might be a rewarding career for others.

James Lambert received his PHD from the University of English Department in 2012 in Early Modern literature; he was also a participant in the Obermann Graduate Institute on Engagement and the Academy. He was an assistant professor of English at the American University of Kuwait from 2012-2016 and now teaches in the English Department of Southern Virginia University. While at the American University, James worked with the One World Shakespeare Project to create live performances of Shakespeare in Kuwait in collaboration with the British Embassy. His students developed activities with and around the performance. He has published articles on Early Modern literature, pedagogy, and his teaching experiences in Kuwait and is currently working on a book, “Lyrical Joy in Early Modern England.”

This event is co-sponsored by the Obermann Center, the English Department, the Graduate College, and International Programs.